VAULT DWELLERS SERVED

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Return To Normal Weather On Earth


Must-have for scavengers ... making burnable bricks from old newspapers and waste paper.

Every shelter needs a rocket stove - it can burn off the exhaust it is so efficient!

Dual task your rocket stove to generate electricity for the shelter! No wasted heat anywhere!

DIY Thermoelectric has never been cheaper!

18 comments:

nfoe said...

In Russia, stove heats you.
http://www.stove.ru/index.php?lng=1&rs=16

nfoe said...

Martin Armstrong said that the last Earth warming cycle was a dead cat bounce.

MycroftJones said...

Rocket mass heaters burn around 800F. For secondary (clean) combustion, you need to get up to 1100F. If you can get enough bricks and stones, a 5 ton masonry heater will do the job.

Nice thing about rocket mass heaters is they give you quick instant heat, because the thin wall of the metal barrel radiates it. If you can afford or build a masonry heater, I believe that is the better way to go.

http://www.pyromasse.ca/infoe.html

Rocket mass heaters share a lot of the same principles as the masonry heater, so it is definitely worthwhile to build one for practice. I did. Lot of fun. More finicky than advertised. Takes a bit of tweaking.

HalibetLector said...

It looks like somebody should have consulted Tex before announcing this:

Civil Infrastructure Platform Announces First Super Long Term Support Kernel at Embedded Linux Conference Europe

They're trying to make a linux distribution that "can be sustained over a period of 10 to as many as 60 years". Sounds right up your alley.

Texas Arcane said...

Thermoelectric generator is going to be a CD-OS project at some point and it will certainly use the supercheap ceramics like the one I linked to. A room full of newspaper bricks and a thermoelectric generator would get you through the first year of a new Ice Age or a year without a summer following a volcanic eruption.

Sam said...

If they want a "Long Term Support Kernel" they need to go with Plan9 Front. Especially as they have to write drivers for it anyways which is what killed plan9. I wonder if plan9 can be compiled on any processor that has a C compiler?

Here's an intro.

http://fqa.9front.org/

Since plan9 is so small it's easy to make sure the code is correct. It has a very small set of mechanisms that do everything. Everything is a file and everything talks through a server to different namespaces (or addresses. Reduces complications and errors.

MycroftJones said...

you thinking of something in the Sterling Engine way for electricity generation, Tex?

Adam Timbermann said...

Electricity and computers are my weak areas. How much electricity would each one of those units put out? How do you chain them together for larger output?

Would a woodstove with a long horizontal pipe work for putting multiple rows of those on it?

Every year when I get my tax refund I make a dent in our bills and put in an order for bad times gear... this year its going to be several Saywer water filters, a couple of 4 brick - paper brink molds, the usual assortment of camping type knives and tools to test, some .22 reloading material, 23 volumes of Backwoods Home Magazine Anthologies (around 6000 pages of self sufficient knowledge), around a hundred issues of Small Farmer's Journal (No tractor farming, primarily using animal power), plus some items bought in bulk to resell at profit so I have ebay money for projects.

FrankNorman said...

Tex, I have a question: Oxygen levels. If plant growth is reduced by the cold, and people are burning things flat-out to keep warm, doesn't that mean that both O2 and burnable biomass are being used faster than they are being replenished?

Texas Arcane said...

@FrankNorman

I have seen evidence lately that most of the oxygen in our atmosphere comes from green plankton and lichen, despite them telling us the only thing standing between us and suffocation is the rain forest.

If you think about the newspaper thrown away in a single day, there is probably enough there to fuel a small family shelter with 12 people for the next thousand years comfortably. The biggest problem is storing it all. The newspaper brick is likely the best solution to this problem for stacking, transporting and burning one at a time.

It is likely that when you went scavenging it would be a good idea to bring back a wheelbarrow of newspaper in the event you could find no wood.

I am interested in hot water produced through this method while you are also cooking dinner. Pretty effective use of energy if you could do all that on one brick of paper.

bicebicebice said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3EPwIphnTI

MycroftJones said...

Anyone have fun ways to re-purpose those 18 volt batteries that are being used in all the cordless power tools now? A 4 amp/hour 18 volt battery holds about 360 kilowatt hours, or as we usually say "360 watts". That can power a 100 watt light bulb for 3 hours. Does it make sense to use these things to store solar power, or is there a better option for off-hours storage of solar power?

Texas Arcane said...

@Mycroft Jones

We gotta get our crew to come up with cheap Edison nickel-iron batteries built from junk you could find anywhere. That's one of the big projects I was planning on. Imagine being able to power your shelter from your rocket stove and charge batteries that won't wear out for a hundred years. The problem with all the batteries they sell nowadays is that they have built-in obsolescence. I have bought the Lithium and Acid batteries but the next time I pay out some serious money I want to pay for the nickel-iron long term storage batteries they make in China. (!) It would be great to know how to make your own from scratch.

Ryan David G said...

@MycroftJones: Don't think you meant "360 kilowatt hours", which is a huge amount (360000 watts for an hour). The most expensive Tesla cars have a 100kWh battery, the Tesla Powerwall battery which can run a small home for a day is 14kWh.

Guessing you mean 360 watt hours, or 100 watts for 3.6 hours / 360 watts for 1 hour.

MycroftJones said...

@Ryan the terminology in Canada, as per the BC Hydro website, acknowledges that kilowatt and watt are used interchangeably here. Maybe it is different where you are. So for now, if I say "watt" or "kilowatt", it means I don't actually know what I'm talking about. I blame socialism and our equalitarian culture ;) Only in Canada does 1 Watt equal 1 Kilowatt. They probably went to gradeschool together. One of them must have been an affirmative action special needs kid. Not sure which one.

@Tex sweet! Looking forward to it. Will these nickel batteries be cheaper than the Tesla PowerWall battery that costs $10,000? And by "Edison" are you referring to some really old battery technology like that battery that has kept the bell ringing for over a hundred years?

What would be nice right now is a battery operated heater just big enough for my chicken drinker, so they have water to drink. Coldest winter in 30 years, been below zero for over a month, in a region that grows bananas and kiwis! Probably a product there is someone wanted to make it. If you could use your 18V battery from your cordless power tools, you could bring a fresh battery with you to the chicken coop when you feed them every morning.

MycroftJones said...

@Tex if most of our oxygen comes from lichen, then my plan to level all the mountains and turn them into fertile farmland is a non-starter. Bummer. Who knew, the rocky, unfarmable mountains are the lungs of the earth!

Eyzid said...

Homo Saps' cranial capacity put into perspective:
https://i.sli.mg/rIdriR.png

Eyzid said...

Homo Saps' shrinking brain put into perspective:
https://i.sli.mg/rIdriR.png

www.000webhost.com